Flower Care Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What exactly is flower food?
  2. What do I do if I don't have enough flower food?
  3. Why aren't ice packs included in your boxes?
  4. Will my flowers be okay even though they were out of water overnight?
  5. Do I need to hold the stems under water as I cut them?
  6. Which flowers will last the longest?
  7. How long will my flowers take to open?
  8. How can I get my Gerbera Daisies to stand up straight?
  9. What should I do if my Sunflowers are drooping?
  10. Why don't any of your mixed bouquets include Daffodils?
  11. Help! My Alstroemeria looks wilted.

What exactly is flower food?

Truth be told, it's not actually food. Cut flowers don't really require anything more than fresh clean water, and the substance known as "flower food" makes sure that's what they get. It's a mild antibacterial agent, and should help keep your water fresh and clear.

What do I do if I don't have enough flower food?

Don't panic. As long as you start with clean water, remove any foliage that rests below the water line, and change the water every few days, your flowers should be fine. If you're truly concerned, you can always add a single drop of bleach to the water, or grab a packet from your grocery store. Most stores that sell flowers will have some on hand, and should be happy to give you one. Don't rely on tricks like putting 7Up in the water or leaving a penny in the vase; if these have any effect at all, it's a negative one.

Why aren't ice packs included in your boxes?

Contrary to popular belief, ice packs actually don't do much for flowers. When we used them, we found that their positive effect on the flowers was almost nil (as they tend to become warm within a few hours of being activated), and they would occasionally come loose and rattle around the box, damaging the flowers. Naturally, we stopped using them.

Will my flowers be okay even though they were out of water overnight?

They'll be fine. You may not know it, but florists have been doing this for years. Flowers are actually quite hardy, especially when they're in bud form, and they will essentially become dormant while they're in transit. The stem ends will seal up, though, so you'll need to cut at least an inch off the bottom of each stem when you receive them. Some flowers may also require a bit of support while they're rehydrating. We wrap our Tulips in protective paper and ship our Gerbera Daisies in a special tray, just for this reason.

Do I need to hold the stems under water as I cut them?

Is it necessary to cut them at an angle? While neither of these practices will hurt your flowers, they won't do much to help them either. Just be sure to cut at least an inch off the end of each stem before you put them in water, and cut off a bit more each time you change the water.

Which flowers will last the longest?

You will probably be pleasantly surprised by the vase life of all of our flowers, but a few do stand out. All varieties of Lilies are extremely long lasting, and some types of Calla Lilies, particularly the tall white and green varieties, share that trait. Cut Orchids also have an exceptionally long vase life, and of course you can't beat our potted Orchids, many of which can be re-bloomed.

How can I make my flowers last longer?

Proper flower care is relatively simple, but can make a huge difference in extending the life of your flowers. Just make sure to change the water regularly, and keep the flowers in a cool (65-72 degrees Fahrenheit) location. If you're willing to make an extra effort, you can try misting the flowers gently; this won't make as dramatic a difference, but may help keep your flowers hydrated.

How long will my flowers take to open?

On average, your flowers should open in 2-3 days, but this does vary with the type of flower you've received. Some flowers will begin opening almost immediately, while others, such as lilies, may take up to a week.

How can I get my Gerbera Daisies to stand up straight?

Gerbera Daisies may occasionally arrive with their stems a bit soft. To ensure that they straighten up properly, you'll want to keep them supported while they rehydrate. Either use the tray they're packed in to suspend the heads while they take their first drink of water, or put a clear drinking straw around each stem. The straws will support them throughout their vase life, and shouldn't detract from the appearance of the flowers.

What should I do if my Sunflowers are drooping?

Sunflowers are unusual among cut flowers in that they actually should be in a bit of sun. Even after they are cut, Sunflower heads will track the sun across the sky, absorbing light and heat. So if your Sunflowers are drooping, it may be because they're not getting enough sunlight. Put them in a sunny window and they should be fine!

Why don't any of your mixed bouquets include Daffodils?

While Daffodils might look beautiful in a mixed bouquet, the bouquet wouldn't last very long. When Daffodil stems are cut, they emit a kind of latex (known colloquially as "Daffodil slime") that can be harmful to other flowers. We don't recommend re-cutting the stems of your Daffodils, as this can cause more slime to be released.

Help! My Alstroemeria looks wilted.

Don't worry; Alstroemeria will often arrive looking a bit tired, but it's probably fine. Just cut the stems, put it in water, and it should start to perk up almost immediately. If it doesn't look beautiful after a day in water, give us a call and we'll see what we can do.